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“Promoting inclusive education throughout primary and lower-secondary education in Mongolia” project Second-phase Baseline Survey Report

Үнэгүй
SICA LLC
Commissioned by Save the Children Japan, SICA LLC, Statistical Institute for Consulting and Analysis, conducted a second phase baseline survey of the project «Promoting Inclusive Education throughout Primary and Lower-secondary Education in Mongolia» in 2022.

The research team is grateful to the specialists of Save the Children Japan, who provided professional and technical support to implement this research. In addition to this, our sincere gratitude is to school directors and training managers, teachers, students and all parents from school No.30  and «Amgalan Complex» school in Bayanzurkh district (BZD), school No.39 and school No. 61 in Chingeltei district (ChD), school No.9 and school No.76 in Songinokhairkhan district (SKhD), school No.3 of Khovd soum, Khovd province, and school No.1 of Uyanga soum, Uvurkhangai province, and representatives of the Commissions of Health, Education and Social Protection for Children with Special Needs  (CHESPCD) and the Council to Support Education Enrollment (CSEE), which assisted in data collection.
 

Судалгааны мэдээлэл

  • Ангилал:Боловсрол
  • Хамрах хүрээ:The baseline study targets the CHESPCD, CSEE, and Bayanzurkh, Chingeltei, Songinokhairkhan districts, and rural areas, namely Khovd soum, Khovd province, and Uyanga soum, Uvurkhangai province.
  • Нийтлэгдсэн он:2022
  • Хуудасны тоо:70
  • Түлхүүр үг:CwSN IE Children with special needs Inclusive edication
  • Үзсэн:96

Судалгааны агуулга

The purpose of the baseline study is to investigate the current situation of the inclusive culture of educational institutions, assess the methods and knowledge of teachers and parents to work with primary and lower-secondary grades children and develop recommendations based on the findings of the research as bases for further development of the project. Within the scope of the goal, the following goals will be met.
1. Assess the 8 public primary schools’ readiness to support 5th-grade students entering lowersecondary schools;
2. Assess the 8 public lower-secondary schools’ support system and physical, academic, and psychological environment for CwSN;
3. Assess the level of knowledge and inclusive teaching skills of lower-secondary teachers in the 8 public schools;
4. Analyze the engagement and awareness level of parents whose children are studying in primary to lower-secondary education;
5. Analyze policy and regulations concerning inclusive education and transfer and support of primary to lower-secondary education.
Save the Children Japan (SC) in Mongolia is implementing a three-year (April 2021 – March 2024) project «Promoting Inclusive Education throughout Primary and Lower-secondary Education in Mongolia», funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan (MoFA), based on the project «Promoting Inclusive Education for Every Last Child in Mongolia» implemented in 2018-2021. The activities of the project are aimed at ensuring 16 target schools’ primary to lower-secondary education transition preparedness, improving the learning environment, improving the knowledge and methodology of primary to lower-secondary education teachers in inclusive education, and increasing public awareness. In the 2nd year of the project, eight more schools were selected, and this baseline study was conducted for those new target schools.

Save the Children Japan (SC), in collaboration with key education stakeholders, including the Ministry of Education and Science; Education and Science Departments in Uvurkhangai and Khovd provinces; Mongolian National University of Education; and the Institute of Teachers’ Professional Development, works across three districts (Bayanzurkh, Chingeltei and Songinokhairkhan districts) of Ulaanbaatar city, and Uvurkhangai and Khovd provinces to strengthen the inclusive education practices in public schools. 
List of tables and figures 5
Abbreviations 8
Acknowledgement 9
Project baseline indicator (2022) 10
CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION  12
1.1   Project background 12
1.2   Research goal and objective 12
1.3   Research scope 13
1.4   Research methodology 13
1.4.1 Quantitative survey 13
1.4.2 Qualitative survey 14
1.5   Data collection and quality control 15
1.6   Limitation of research 15
CHAPTER 2. CURRENT SITUATION OF STUDENTS TRANSITIONING FROM PRIMARY TO LOWER-SECONDARY SCHOOL 16
2.1   Information about 4-9th grade children without special needs 16
2.1.1 General information of 4-9th grade children without special needs 16
2.1.2 Assistance and support provided by 4-9th grade children without special needs to CwSN 19
2.2  General information on 4-9th grade CwSN  and current situation of children       transitioning from primary to lower-secondary school 23
2.2.1 General information on 4-9th grade CwSN 23
2.2.2 Situation of the 4-9th grade CwSN transitioning from primary to lower-secondary school 23
2.2.3 Support being provided/has been provided to 4-9th grade CwSN 26
CHAPTER 3. CURRENT SITUATION OF REGULAR SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS IN RELATION TO INCLUSIVE EDUCATION 31
3.1   Preparation by school and teachers for CwSN transitioning from primary to lower-secondary grades (primary grade teachers) 32
3.2   Understanding and knowledge about inclusive education (all teachers) 33
3.3   IE system and school and teachers’ activities towards CwSN (all teachers) 39
3.3.1 IE system and teachers’ activities towards CwSN 39
3.3.2 IE system and school activities for CwSN 43
CHAPTER 4. PARENTAL SUPPORT FOR TRANSITIONING AND CONTINUOUS LEARNING OF THE CHILD  44     
4.1  General information of parents of 4-6th grade children 45
4.2  Understanding and knowledge of IE 47
4.3  Parental participation in children’s learning and development 51
CHAPTER 5. INCLUSIVE EDUCATION POLICY AND IMPLEMENTATION 55 Project baseline indicators (2021 and 2022) 59
Conclusions 61 Suggestions and recommendations 66
Appendix: Mongolian laws, legal documents and regulations 68
Table 1.          Project outcomes 12
Table 2.          Sampling distribution of quantitative survey 14
Table 3.          Sampling distribution of qualitative survey 14
Table 4.          General information about students (grades, age) who participated in the survey 16
Table 5.          Satisfaction and reasons for studying at the school, by percentage and grades 18
Table 6.          Favorite subject, by frequency and percentage 18
Table 7.          Whether students’ teachers and family members explain and teach students to help their friends with special needs, by percentage 20
Table 8.          General information on CwSN (grade, age) 23
Table 9.          General information about teachers involved in the survey, by numbers and percentage 31
Table 10.        Who are the CwSN (whether they are homeroom teachers), by percentage 34
Table 11.        Teachers’ opinions about CwSN (whether homeroom teacher or not), by percentage 36
Table 12.        General information of surveyed parents 45
Table 13.        Types of special needs of children of surveyed parents, by number and percentage 46
Figure 1.         Research method 13
Figure 2.         Monitoring stages of quantitative survey 15
Figure 3.         Number of years of study at the current school and percentage 17
Figure 4.         Whether students like to study at the school, by percentage and grades 17
Figure 5.         Whether there are any CwSN in the class, by percentage 19
Figure 6.         When do you help your friend with special needs, by percentage 19
Figure 7.         Frequency of helping the friend with special needs, by percentage 20
Figure 8.        Constraints encountered by CwSN in doing their lessons and attending the school, by percentage (the sum of responses is higher than 100 as it is a multiple choice question)  21
Figure 9.         Whether teachers treat all children equally, by percentage 21
Figure 10.       What support children transitioning from primary to lower-secondary grades                       need from students in lower-secondary grades, by percentage  22
Figure 11.       Whether support to peers and lower grade students was undertaken upon own initiative, by percentage 22
Figure 12.       Whether any preparation is being done/has been done for transitioning from primary to lower-secondary school, by percentage and grades 23
Figure 13.       Preparation being done/has been done for transitioning from primary to lower secondary school, by percentage and grades 24
Figure 14.      Obstacles encountered in transitioning from primary to lower-secondary school, by percentage and grade 24
Figure 15.       Whether the teacher discussed with the student about the transition from primary to lower-secondary school, by percentage 25
Figure 16.      Information provided to students by teachers, by percentage  26
Figure 17.      Whether family members help CwSN, by percentage 26
Figure 18.      About support provided by the families to primary grade CwSN, by percentage (the sum is greater than 100 as it is a multiple choice question) 27
Figure 19.      About support provided by the families to lower-secondary grade CwSN, by percentage (the sum is greater than 100 as it is a multiple choice question) 27
Figure 20.      Whether teachers and classmates help CwSN who study in lower-secondary grades, by percentage  28
Figure 21.      Obstacles encountered by CwSN in attending the classes, by percentage (the sum is greater than 100 as it is a multiple choice question) 28

Figure 22.      Whom CwSN contact when they need help and support at the school, by percentage 29
Figure 23.      Whether below-mentioned circumstances create barriers, by percentage 30
Figure 24.      Preparatory work by school and teachers, by percentage 32
Figure 25.      Preparatory works conducted jointly with the stakeholders (teacher, parents, training manager, and social worker etc) to prepare CwSN for transitioning from primary to lower-secondary grades, by percentage 32
Figure 26.      Support provided by the parents to CwSN transitioning from primary to lower secondary grades, by percentage 33
Figure 27.      Whether teachers attended any training on IE in the last 3 years, by percentage 33
Figure 28.      Attendance of IE training in the last 3 years (whether a homeroom teacher), by percentage 34
Figure 29.      Attendance of IE training in the last 3 years, primary and lower-secondary grade homeroom and non-homeroom teachers, by percentage 34
Figure 30.      Attendance of IE training in the last 3 years, whether they work with CwSN, by percentage 34
Figure 31.      Teachers’ understanding of inclusive education (whether homeroom teacher or not), by percentage 35
Figure 32.      Teachers’ understanding of inclusive education (whether they work with CwSN), by percentage 35
Figure 33.      Views of teachers regarding IE (whether homeroom teacher or not), by percentage  37
Figure 34.      Teachers’ knowledge and competency self-assessment regarding CwSN (by average scores) 38
Figure 35.      Teachers’ assessment of parental knowledge and participation regarding IE (by average score) 38
Figure 36.      Teacher’s performance related to child development information (homeroom teachers), by percentage 39
Figure 37.      Methodology of assessing the progress in child development of CwSN, by percentage (sum is greater than 100 as it is a multiple choice question)  40
Figure 38.      Sharing of experiences on IE and working with CwSN, by percentage 40
 Figure 39.      Obstacles related to the school environment in providing IE, by percentage (sum is greater than 100 as it is a multiple choice question) 41
Figure 40.      Priority activities needed for inclusive education, by percentage. 41
Figure 41.      Skills and competencies required for working with CwSN, content, by percentage. 42
Figure 42.      Whether school undertakes measures to strengthen IE, by percentage 43
Figure 43.      Whether the school is friendly to CwSN, by percentage 44
Figure 44.      Place of diagnosing the child, by percentage 46
Figure 45.      Whether the child has been a school dropout, by percentage 46
Figure 46.      Factors that affected school dropouts, by number 47
Figure 47.      Attendance of training on IE, by percentage 47
Figure 48.      Attendance of training, by primary and lower-secondary grade children’s parents, by percentage. 47
 Figure 49.      Attendance of training on IE, whether they have CwSN, by percentage 48
Figure 50.      Understanding of IE, whether they have CwSN, by percentage 48
Figure 51.      Perceptions of IE, parents of primary and lower-secondary grade students, by percentage 48
Figure 52.      What special needs of children they think are better off at a special school are, by number It was revealed that the largest number of parents believe that children with mobility impairment or speech impediment should study in special schools.   49
Figure 53.      Whether parents agree with the given statements, by percentage 49
Figure 54.      Self-assessment of parents’ knowledge and perception regarding CwSN (whether they have CwSN), by scoring 50
Figure 55.      Support in children’s studies at home, by percentage 51
Figure 56.      Support provided by parents at home, by percentage 52
Figure 57.      Types of support needed for CwSN transitioning from primary to lower secondary grades, by percentage  53
Figure 58.      Constraints encountered in transition from primary to lower-secondary grade, lower-secondary grade children’s parents, by percentage 54

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